30 September 2013

Fall jumper in muted coral, brown, and beige plaid.

So I've finished my next project, a 1940's jumper (Butterick 2466, to be exact)! It has a fitted waist band, gathered skirt, deep v-neck, and lovely front pockets (I'm a little obsessed with pockets). The colour scheme is very autumn, and may be the most cheery palate I have in my fall/winter wardrobe. I'm actually not much for bright fabrics, and prefer desaturated or even "drab" choices when it comes to what I wear. Luckily, there's always plenty of detailing in 1940's patterns, so I don't {really}have to worry about looking plain.

I also have to add, how excited I am that Summertime is over. I did enjoy a nice harvest from my garden this year (11 pounds of potatoes, endless heirloom tomatoes...and more quinoa than I know what to do with) and we had some nice adventures in the sun. Overall however, I've never been much for summer weather (sorry sun, you can go back behind the clouds now), I can barely tolerate temperatures above 80. I am always excited for when the rain and gloom hits again...I guess that's why I am so in love with the Pacific Northwest (although, I could go for colder winter temperatures and some real snow).

This pattern was very simple to put together, and I even finished off the waistband properly with some bias tape. Normally I finish off seam edges quickly, terrible, I know...but not this time! I also used a blind hem, which is my preferred hemming method these days. It's quick and easy, but also allows the finished seam to hang without any odd quirks. Anyway, I absolutely love this jumper. It's very easy to wear, pairs well with a cardigan, and did I mention it has pockets?? When worn with my vintage 1940's stockings, it can be very warm too!












I apologize for the picture quality, our computer crashed and I've had to upload pictures on the netbook we use for traveling. The images had to be downsized considerably..and some of the quality was lost! My next project is a gorgeous early 1940's dress in oxblood cotton. Hopefully we'll get the computer restored before I finish!
Thanks for stopping by!

15 comments:

  1. Lovely! And I NEED those stockings!
    -Sandra

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    1. Thank you! 1940's stockings are definitely my choice for colder weather, since they are heavier weight...plus they last longer (and are easier to mend up).

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  2. Well done! Retro, but beautiful for today. I love your shoes too.

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    1. Thanks! Yes, the shoes are one of the most comfortable pairs I own...it's difficult to find a nice solid heel to walk around on!

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  3. Love it! The colours look great on you. But hey... did you say you grow your own quinoa... in the pacific northwest? How did you manage that? I'm from Vancouver and I've never seen it grow here.

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    1. Thank you! Yes, growing quinoa is actually really easy here! Mine grew to be about 10ft tall (not even kidding...) and I harvested tons of seeds. You just have to make sure to select for those which are more resistant to germination in the seed head. I got mine from Wild Garden Seed, in Oregon.

      We have the mild summers that this crop loves.
      http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/15/212342707/can-quinoa-farming-go-global-without-leaving-andeans-behind

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    2. Wow, that's amazing! I might see if I can find some seeds in the spring.

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  4. Really lovely! I love the pairing of your tartan jumper with deep blue blouse.
    I agree with the de-saturated colours, I prefer them too but every now and then lime green seems to sneak in.

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    1. Thank you, I love that blouse, it goes with just about everything. I wish I could pull off lime green, but it is perhaps the most unflattering colour on my skin tone. In the absence of sun during winter, a bright colour or two might serve as a temporary substitute!

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  5. This becoming jumper ensemble seems a million miles away from drab to me. Quite the opposite actually, it seems to twinkle with the beauty of autumn's foliage on you, dear lady. Dark haired, fair skinned lasses like yourself can pull of earth tones so resplendently.

    Thank you deeply for both of your immensely lovely blog comments (and early Anniversary wishes) today, my fellow October loving lady (it's my favourite month, too - I swear, if I was a month, I'd be October).

    It's really cool that you got to spend time in Calgary once. I really agree with you about what a clean city it is. I'd always thought so when I lived there (sure, there were a few scuzzy streets and back alleyways, but what city doesn't have those here and there?), and found it to be even cleaner than I remembered this time around (far cleaner than Toronto, where we lived for six years).

    Wishing you a magnificent October!
    ♥ Jessica

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    1. Thank you, for your wonderful comment. Your lovely compliments are much appreciated! I do love the colours this fabric has to offer, and it's true...I definitely prefer earth tones!

      Yes, we loved visiting Calgary! Our only complaint was how expensive the beer was...but that's pretty much everywhere outside of the states (but nowhere near as expensive as the $15 pint in Norway, whew!).

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  6. So lovely! Nice job on finishing those seams with bias tape, they look very neat.
    How do you grow/harvest quinoa? I want to have a go too!

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    1. Thanks! It helps the waist line stay more defined, since it goes over layers, so that helps a lot!

      Quinoa is actually relatively easy to grow. I used a rich compost base for my soil which I combined with regular potting soil. Try to keep nitrogen-based fertilization down to a minimum, or you will end up with plants that invest most of their energy into leaves and stems...instead of seed heads. I still used some organic vegan fertilizer though, because I wanted the plants to develop taller to increase surface area of crop production. It's a bit of a balance really. I also water stressed my plants in cycles. Quinoa is somewhat adapted to dry cycles and I feel it's healthy to rough them up a bit to get them to fruit more.

      I planted them directly into the soil (the seedlings don't transplant well) and they sprouted in about a week. They grow slowly at first and then shoot upward...so watch out for weeds that may shade them out. They like full sun also. It's actually one of the easiest plants I've grown!

      Harvesting is a bit more tricky and time consuming. You have to wait until the leaves yellow and the plant dies (also...hope it doesn't rain in the meantime because many WILL germinate before you can harvest them!). I just went around and rubbed some of the seed heads in my hands...if they broke loose, it was harvest time! Make sure to wash the seeds well, to rid them of saponin. You can run them through a washing machine, tied in nylons, without detergent...or wash them rigorously until the water runs clear of foam.

      Hope that helps!

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  7. Gorgeous, you threw me at first because you said jumper which in the UK is a sweater, so I thought it was a knitting post SSB https://facebook.com/sassysewingbees ❀

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    1. Ah, I could see that happening! Knitting is on my list of things to learn, so perhaps someday you will see a "jumper" post! ;)

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